• Buy & Sell your domain names commission free on Canada's most trusted domaining community. Get your own landing page with a custom website address dn.ca/market/user at: Market Pages

.CA value compared to .COM value? (1 Viewing)

domains

Member
Joined
Nov 18, 2020
Topics
56
Posts
962
Likes
498
Market
So what is the general thought on the .ca value to the .com value? I have seen general comments over the years as 10% to 20%.

I think in some cases it could be <10%, for example if an international company that operates very little or not at all in Canada were to buy a .com for xxx,xxx the .ca wouldn't mean very much to them.

Likewise it could be more than 20% if the company has significant business in Canada or is known as a Canadian company.

Anyone like to add their thoughts on this topic?
 

domains

Member
Joined
Nov 18, 2020
Topics
56
Posts
962
Likes
498
Market
Take the example of a Canadian based retail company with significant presence in Canada and the US, they buy the .com of their company name or an important service/product they sell in both countries for $200,000. What 'could' the exact match domain in .ca be worth to that company?
 

MapleDots

Community Guide
Verified Member
Boardroom Access
Joined
Nov 4, 2020
Topics
851
Posts
3,630
Likes
3,099
Market
I am currently working with a US company

I quoted $240k for the .com & 25k for the .ca

It is an exact match to the company name so the odds are in my favour.


General rule for me is I would like to get 10% to the .com value but there are exceptions where I would ask for more.

Here is when...

- Is it an exact match
- Is the .com used by someone else
- Are the other extensions registered
- Can the domain be used in commerce for multiple uses.
- Is the company asking to purchase an LLC company.

For the 5 reasons above I can increase over the 10% value example.

In closing... the 10% is a guide, a good domainer will look at all aspects of the sale and determine end value based on who he is doing business with. That is why I never sell to brokers or quote blindly without knowing the end user.